Last minute opening for July 22nd frame class

26 06 2013

There has been an cancellation for my July 22nd class only a month away.   This is your chance to circumvent the 6 month queue and get to making some bikes.   Check out my website to secure your spot htttp://www.framebuildingschool.com

Thanks everyone!

Dave Bohm





You really don’t need a fancy jig…really!

9 05 2013

What I speak of a generally called a frame fixture or jig.   An apparatus that holds all the frame tubes in the right proximity to one another to allow one to weld/braze a bicycle frame.   Believe it or not a most excellent job can be done without one or with minimal fixturing.

Yes, I have one.   Actually I have three.   What does it do for the professional?  It makes us much faster while still being accurate.   Time is money and in addition to that I am fully capable of screwing up at a moments notice.  I have literally looked at a number and convinced myself it says something else so fixtures remove the possibility of making gross errors.   It is much easier to look at the seat angle of my Anvil fixture and when the hash mark lines up with 73 degrees, its 73 degrees.   Yes it’s a beautiful thing and I highly recommend the fixturing from any of the great suppliers.

I want to say this.  If a fixture is not easily set up and accurate when set up I rather not even have it.   Yes, I would rather build with a simple surface plate than have a fixture with a headache of a setup, is slow to setup and only opens me up to mistakes.   So it’s either a well made fixture, professional solution  or table.

Most students have the fixture/jig and numero uno priority when they get home.  I press very hard that so much comes before this.   Of course the basic hand tools, work bench, vise, torches but the next thing on my list is a flat surface of some sort.   You cannot (yes I said it) you cannot do good accurate work with only a frame jig.  You must have some way of confirming your work and therefore the surface plate is central to the whole process.   Does it have to be a big heavy thing?  not one bit.   We are not looking for aerospace tolerances here.  Many solutions will do.

Wait, there is more!   Do you know you can use your table as a fixturing device as well.   With some very simple hardware, much of it bought from tooling suppliers for very little money you can build accurately and quickly.  One of my former students just did such a thing and I am very proud of what he has done.   Pictures to follow.   The concept is simple.  It was relatively inexpensive and allows for great variations in design.  Also it allows for the requisite checks necessary to ensure a well aligned bicycle frame.

post3 Jig 3 Jig 2 post1

post6





Partial scholarship for framebuilding course in July

2 04 2013

$1,500 Framebuilding Scholarship

How:

Create a public social media campaign (YouTube videos/blogs/Tumblr page/whatever) to convince me why you deserve this scholarship. Judging is based on your creativity so have fun with it. Women and people from continents I have not taught from (Central and South American, Africa, Middle East, Far East) are highly encouraged to apply.

Fine print:

  • This scholarship is for the 07/08 to 07/20- 2013 class only.
  • Deadline for submission is May 15th 2013
  • The scholarship only covers half of the tuition. The winner still needs to pay the other half of the tuition, along with room, food, and transportation.
  • Scholarship winner must pay the $500 deposit at the time of scholarship acceptance.
  • Half of the remaining balance ($500) is due 2 months prior to the class start date.




Takin’ it to a whole nother level…..

2 08 2012

Got to toot my own horn here for a moment.  I recently finished a paint job on a student frame from a few months back.   This student stayed for a month and built two frames taking both the 101 and 202 courses back to back.  This is his second frame and incorporates more advanced techniques like lug cutting and producing your own lugs through a process called bi-lamination.  He did almost all of this himself.  The lug decorations were 100% him.  I only guided on the next steps following the production of the first frame.

I am throwing down the gauntlet on this one.

the gauntlet

If you are looking for a bicycle frame building school and you can find one that has empowered students to produced  results  ANYTHING like this then I wholeheartedly suggest you go there.

Around here at Bohemian….who know, we take it to a whole nother level…..





Some Lug hotness on a Tuesday

4 10 2011

Lest you think that because I am totally lame and almost never update my stuff (blog, facebook or websites) here are some goodies I have been working on.

and a sneak preview of retardedniculousness coming out the shop…





You have got to train and train some more

1 09 2011

I think most people would take it as a given that you have to physically train to be an athlete.  One cannot get physically fit once in their lives and then hope to perform for future events without consistent training.   Another aspect we all take for granted is that one has to work on building new skills or working on the stuff that does not come naturally to them.   If a basketball player has amazing skills with layups but cannot free-throw well it makes sense that you would practice a lot more on the weak part of your game and not the strong one.

The very same is true of craft.  In this case framebuilding.    It takes practice and consistent training to grow as a craftsmen.   It is not enough to be very good at part of it and ignore your weak points.   One should study then practice new skills that will make one a better crafts-person.

Sadly though I see this very problem all too often within the framebuilding community and it is also perpetuated by the consumer themselves.

Everyone starts as a beginner, that is to be expected.   Then there is the period of learning.   You soak up everything you can read and practice.   Your muscle memory begins to develop and your work gets better by leaps and bounds.   A lot like bike racing where an athlete with talent moves up the ranks quickly and then seems to  peter  out when the going gets really tough the same thing happens to crafts-people.    I am not sure why.  Either they are not capable of more, or they feel that is good enough.    These are the types who would often say ” I have been doing it this way for X years and it is good enough for me”.   They don’t practice anymore, they don’t look for new and better solutions, they don’t seek out new skills to add to their existing repertoire.

Customers are also guilty of this.   I know it may come as a shock to some but I do not know how to do everything, I am constantly learning.   Painting  is good example of this for me.   I started the process of learning how to paint around 2006.   Many of my customers expected that two weeks of private instruction would make me a master of bicycle frame painting.   Five years later I am just to the point where I feel confident that I can tackle most anything you throw at me and even though I would be confident I could do it, I still know I have a long way to go.   I train with my painting.   By that I mean I paint more than bicycle frames that come in for service or my own work.   In order to be a good painter you have to…wait for it….PAINT!   I paint everything I can get my hands on.   My motorcycle, my car, the mailbox etc.  On weekends I practice airbrushing or mix a new color or make a panel.   How would I know what could be done unless I try it?  How will I be able to offer my customers something really neat unless I have experimented with it in the past.

So, what I am getting at here is that the time involved with building a bicycle or for that matter a guitar, chair or wonkywonderburple from Dr. Suess is not just the time you use to make it, its the time that you trained to get there.  It’s the time that you practiced and learned and read and failed.    A concert given by a violinist is not one hour at the music hall that you paid for but the thousands, maybe 10′s of thousands of hours that went into that one hour.    A great bike frame is not 300 dollars in raw materials and 16 hours like some think it is.   To me it’s the culmination of all the years that went before, all the knowledge and all the hours, dollars and setbacks. Only after all that effort,consistent training and practice will you be able to make something really great.





Alloneword…Cycling Caps

4 07 2011

Hey, you know every once in a while you come across something so good you just have to tell people about it.

One of those this is Cycling Caps made by Mary at Alloneword.

http://www.allonewordshop.com/

The caps are great!  Super easy to deal with and comon!  personalized envelopes?  over the top but it won’t probably come as some surprise I think this…..SUPPORT your  local or semi-local crafts-persons!!





Gorgeous student made bicycle!

2 06 2011

I just got some pictures of a student bicycle that was built here earlier in the year.  He got it built up and sent me some pictures.  Wonderful work and shows what someone can do with a little help and some determination.   The finish is electroless nickel plate and I am very proud of his finish work.  Clean brazing and great lug filing/edging.

Let the pictures speak for themselves….





The Future…

18 03 2011

A friend of mine does these “de-motivational” based posters which are a crackup.   What is old is new again…





Recent frame students

16 03 2011
IMG_5471 by dbohemian
Been working with some frame students, they all did great work!

My first female frame student and a 100% KVA stainless steel frame with lugs.

A nice commuting frame.








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